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151 (4/29/2012; FORBES/JACKSON Linda (View posts) Posted: 11 Oct 2000 12:00PM GMT Classification: Query Surnames: FORBES, JACKSON ;At first we thought my gggg-grandparents were married in Green County, KY on 8-2-1821, but now there is evidence to think that they were married in Barren County. Their names were YATES FORBES and MARGARET (Margarite?) JACKSON. Any connections out there?) Jackson, Margaret (I20216)
 
152 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I15958)
 
153 (Age Source: Rev. Camp, wife and other family members also went except one son who stayed in NC.and I am descended from him. His name was Abner Camp. Elizabeth Camp Anthony EAnthony@prodigy.net)

U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900 Name: Joseph Camp Gender: male Birth Place: VA Birth Year: 1741 Spouse Name: Susannah Roundtree Number Pages: 1

U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900 Name: Joseph Camp Gender: male Birth Place: VA Birth Year: 1741 Spouse Name: Susannah Roundtree Marriage State: of NC Number Pages: 1 
Camp, Joseph (I9411)
 
154 (Death date source: Crawford County Death; Richard Eastridge; 1834-1919; Crawford County Historical Society) Highfill, Clarence K. (I16914)
 
155 (From: Vickie Miller [mailto:vickie7293@msn.com] ; Sent: Friday, December 30, 2011 1:41 PM; To: Ron Yates; Subject: Re: Truman Day; The Bible records of Truman Day are correct. His daughter Margaret (Peggy) married Edward Bines Pettis) BIBLE RECORDS: Truman Day Sr. was born A. D. 1764 Feby 14th; Peggy Day was Born A.D. 1790 Sept 21st; Ackley Day was Born A. D. 1793 Feby 21st; Wm T. Day was Born A. D. 1795 Nov 22nd; Mary Day was Born A. D. 1798 Jan’y 27th; Married to P. G. Oliver 16th day of Oct 1817 (incorrect date-marriage record lists date as 3-9-1815 by Rev. Richard Tilton); Saunders P. Day was Born A. D. Apirl 7th 1800; P. G. Oliver was married to L. M. Hubbard on 1st Jany 1851; Births: Melia Day was Born A. D. 1803 Feby 9th; Charles A. Day was Born A. D. 1805 Dec.er 23rd; Elizabeth Day was Born A. D. 1808 16th Octr; Truman Day Jr. was Born A.D. 1811 Mch 23rd; Francis H. Day was Born A.D. 1813 Sept 27th; Middian W. Day was Born A. D. 1816 Jany 13th; Martha Ann Day was Born A. D. 1818 May 7th; Jas. Dudley Day was Born A. D. 1820 August 23rd; Rebecca S. Day was Born A. D. 1824 April 15th; Catherine Day wife of Truman Day was Born A. D. (1788?) Mch 25th ; Jesse T. Beal was Born June 2nd 1836; Deaths: Mary Day Oliver died on 17th day of August 1850 aged 52 years, 6 months and 20 days; [Davis Bible –Fleming Co KY Webpage-Rootsweb In possession of Mrs. John A. Denton Hillsboro, KY copied by William M. Talley]

Maryland, Births and Christenings Index, 1662-1911 about Truman Day Name: Truman Day Gender: Male Birth Date: 14 Feb 1764 Birth Place: Saint Johns Parish, Prince Georges, Maryland Father's Name: William Day Mother's Name: Mary FHL Film Number: 14303

U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900 about Thurman Day Name: Thurman Day Gender: Male Spouse Name: Mary Saunders Number Pages: 1

Kentucky, Tax Lists, 1799-1801 about Truman Day Name: Truman Day Residence County: Fleming Residence Year: 1800

1810 United States Federal Census about Truman Day Name: Truman Day Home in 1810 (City, County, State): Flemingsburg, Fleming, Kentucky Free White Persons - Males - Under 10: 1 Free White Persons - Males - 10 thru 15: 2 Free White Persons - Males - 16 thru 25: 2 Free White Persons - Males - 45 and over: 1 Free White Persons - Females - Under 10: 2 Free White Persons - Females - 10 thru 15: 1 Free White Persons - Females - 16 thru 25: 1 Free White Persons - Females - 26 thru 44: 1 Number of Household Members Under 16: 6 Number of Household Members Over 25: 2 Number of Household Members: 11

1820 United States Federal Census about Truman Day Name: Truman Day Home in 1820 (City, County, State): Poplar Plains, Fleming, Kentucky Enumeration Date: August 7, 1820 Free White Persons - Males - Under 10: 2 Free White Persons - Males - 10 thru 15: 1 Free White Persons - Males - 16 thru 25: 1 Free White Persons - Males - 45 and over: 1 Free White Persons - Females - Under 10: 2 Free White Persons - Females - 10 thru 15: 1 Free White Persons - Females - 16 thru 25: 1 Free White Persons - Females - 26 thru 44: 1 Slaves - Males - Under 14: 1 Slaves - Females - Under 14: 1 Slaves - Females - 14 thru 25: 1 Number of Persons - Engaged in Agriculture: 3 Free White Persons - Under 16: 6 Free White Persons - Over 25: 2 Total Free White Persons: 10 Total Slaves: 3 Total All Persons - White, Slaves, Colored, Other: 13

1830 United States Federal Census about Truman Day Name: Truman Day Home in 1830 (City, County, State): Eastern Division, Fleming, Kentucky Free White Persons - Males - 10 thru 14: 1 Free White Persons - Males - 60 thru 69: 1 Free White Persons - Females - 5 thru 9: 1 Free White Persons - Females - 10 thru 14: 1 Free White Persons - Females - 15 thru 19: 1 Free White Persons - Females - 20 thru 29: 1 Free White Persons - Females - 40 thru 49: 1 Slaves - Males - 10 thru 23: 1 Slaves - Females - 10 thru 23: 1 Slaves - Females - 24 thru 35: 1 Free White Persons - Under 20: 4 Free White Persons - 20 thru 49: 2 Total Free White Persons: 7 Total Slaves: 3 Total - All Persons (Free White, Slaves, Free Colored): 10

1840 United States Federal Census about Treeman Day Name: Treeman Day [Truman Day] Home in 1840 (City, County, State): Division 1, Fleming, Kentucky Free White Persons - Males - 70 thru 79: 1 Free White Persons - Females - Under 5: 1 Free White Persons - Females - 15 thru 19: 1 Free White Persons - Females - 60 thru 69: 1 Slaves - Males - Under 10: 3 Slaves - Males - 24 thru 35: 1 Slaves - Females - Under 10: 2 Slaves - Females - 24 thru 35: 1 Persons Employed in Agriculture: 1 Free White Persons - Under 20: 2 Total Free White Persons: 4 Total Slaves: 7 Total All Persons - Free White, Free Colored, Slaves: 11

1850 United States Federal Census about Truman Day Name: Truman Day Age: 86 Birth Year: abt 1764 Birthplace: Maryland Home in 1850: Division 2, Fleming, Kentucky Gender: Male Family Number: 510 Household Members: Name Age Truman Day 86 Catharine Day 69 Delpha Day 52

Kentucky, Compiled Census and Census Substitutes Index, 1810-1890 about Truman Day Name: Truman Day State: KY County: Fleming County Township: Div. 2 Year: 1850 Record Type: Slave Schedule Page: 807 Database: KY 1850 Slave Schedule

Truman Day Birth: Feb. 14, 1764 Death: Feb. 17, 1855 Burial: Edens Chapel Cemetery Hillsboro Fleming County Kentucky, USA Created by: Daniel Wyatt Record added: Nov 04, 2013 Find A Grave Memorial# 119793196 
Day, Truman Sr. (I13023)
 
156 (Her parents): U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900 Name: George Kepley Gender: Male Birth Place: NC Birth Year: 1772 Spouse Name: Anna Catherine Byerly Spouse Birth Place: NC Spouse Birth Year: 1769 Marriage Year: 1790 Marriage State: NC

Indiana Census, 1790-1890 Name: George Kepley State: IN County: Harrison County Township: Militia Year: 1812 Page: NPL Database: IN 1812 Census Index

1820 United States Federal Census Name: George Kepley Home in 1820 (City, County, State): Harrison, Indiana Enumeration Date: August 7, 1820

(Her spouse): Indiana Marriages to 1850 Spouse 1: Kepley, Elizabeth Spouse 2: Moser, John Marriage Date: 11 Aug 1814 Marriage Location: Indiana Harrison County

1850 United States Federal Census Name: Elisabeth Moser Age: 55 Birth Year: abt 1795 Birthplace: North Carolina Home in 1850: District 45, Harrison, Indiana Race: White Gender: Female Family Number: 421 John Moser 65 Elisabeth Moser 55 Nimrod Moser 23 Franklin Moser 21 Catharine Moser 15 Elisabeth Moser 13

1860 United States Federal Census Name: Elizabeth Moses[Elizabeth Moser] Age in 1860: 65 Birth Year: abt 1795 Birthplace: North Carolina Home in 1860: Morgan, Harrison, Indiana Gender: Female Post Office: Byrnville John Moses 75 Elizabeth Moses 65 Elizabeth Moses 18 Emanuel Blois 25 Harriet Blois 22 Robert B Blois 3 Samuel Morris 22 
Kepley, Elizabeth (I12855)
 
157 (Obituary from the La Grande Observer) Died, near Summerville, August 14, 1918, Mrs. Sarah Meyers Glenn, wife of the late T.T. Glenn was born in Memphis, Mo., March 8, 1849, crossed the plains with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Henry A. Myers, settled in Grande Ronde Valley, near Summerville, Oregon, was married to Talbert T. Glenn, September 20, 1868, where she has continued to reside.

To them were born nine children of which eight survive, Chas. Edwin, of Lostine, Oregon; Hattie A. McWilliams, of Oakland, California; Daisy Settlemire of Portland, Ore., Wm. H., Arthur C., Guy J., Mina A. Standley and Myra McKenzie, all of Union County, also two sisters, Mrs. Kate Wade and Mrs. J.W. Tuttle, a brother, B.F. Myres, of Culdesac, Idaho, also thirteen grand children. 
Meyers, Sarah (I15750)
 
158 (Obituary published in the "Terre Haute Tribune," Friday, July 22, 1960, page 2:) "WEST UNION, Ill., July 22. - (Special)-Herschel Higginbotham, 57 years old, of RR 1, West Union, died at 12:45 o'clock Thursday afternoon at the Paris Hospital. Surviving are the widow, Dema; two sons, Ronald of Marshall, Ill., and Robert Higginbotham, at home; three sisters, Mrs. Lula Bierbaum of Marshall, Mrs. Hattie Lederman of RR, West Union, and Mrs. Mattie Carpenter of RR 2, West Union; and four brothers, Ed Higginbotham of RR 2, West Union, Ott and Harry, both of Marshall, Ill., and Ormal of Martinsville, Ill.

Services will be at 2 o'clock Saturday afternoon at the Prust-Hosch Funeral Chapel. Burial will be in Harrison cemetery. Friends may call at the funeral chapel after 7 o'clock Friday evening. "Cause of death: Bronchogenic carcinoma of lung (" lung cancer"). Additional complication not related to cause of death: Chronic glomerulonephritis ("Bright's disease"). Attending physician: Charles A. McClelland, M.D., Paris Hospital. Funeral services were conducted at 2:00 p.m. in the Prust-Hosch Funeral Chapel, West Union, Illinois on July 23, 1960. Officiating was Reverend Robert Shepard. Pallbearers were Gordon Coryell, Hermann Timms, Dale Clatfelter, Tom Hill, Fred Gard, and John Sydnor. Pianist was Helen Crumrin. 
Higginbotham, Hershel (I4312)
 
159 (on 1850 Census Crawford Co., Sarah Swift 80 b. VA living with Benjamin) 1850 United States Federal Census Name: Benjamin Yates Age: 50 Estimated birth year: abt 1800 Birth Place: Kentucky Gender: Male Home in 1850 (City,County,State): Union, Crawford, Indiana Family Number: 48 Benjamin Yates 50 Sarah Swift 80 Sarah Yates 30 Daniel Yates 28

1860 United States Federal Census Name: Benj Yates Age in 1860: 68 Birth Year: abt 1792 Birthplace: Kentucky Home in 1860: Union, Crawford, Indiana Gender: Male Post Office: Grantsburg Benj Yates 68 Sarah Yates 35 Zerelda Watson 27 George Main 7

On Ben, I updated my record to indicate his birth year as Abt. 1792/1800. The problem is we have two source documents which show these ages which we would normally use to justify DOB. It's hard to say which is right, do you believe him at age 50 saying he was born in 1792 or when he was 68 saying he was born in 1800. Unless you have some other facts that I don't remember I think this was my rationale for using this DOB for Ben Yates. Ron Yates 03/16/2008

Petition to sell his real estate is filed Oct 24, 1865 therefore I have used this as the best known death date. Ron Yates

Petition to sell real estate Elijah F. Roberson Administrator of the estate of Benjamin Yates deed: Be it remembered that heretofore to wite Oct 24 1865 this following petition was filed in the office of the Clerk of the Court of Common Pleas of Crawford County Indiana by said administrator to wite the undersigned administrator of the Estate of Benjamin Yates Deed would represent to the court of Common Pleas of said County that the personal estate of said decedent amounts to the probable sum of $340 and that the claims against the same so far as the sum has come to the knowledge of your petitioner amount to the probable sum of $1,400-leaving $1,000 of indebtedness over the value of the personal estate that decedent died the owner in fee simple of the following Real Estate in Crawford County Indiana The East Half of The North West Quarter, and the North West Quarter of the North West Quarter of Section 14, in Township three South, of Range 1 West, the East Quarter of the North East Quarter of Section 15 and the South Half of the North West Quarter of the North East Quarter of Section 15 same Town & Range containing in all one hundred acres.

And that decedent left as his heirs the following persons who are his nephews JOHN YATES, TOLBERT YATES, SILAS YATES, DANIEL YATES, ELI YATES, SILAS YATES, WILLIAM YATES and GEORGE YATES and the following persons who are his nieces CASA MARTIN, RACHAEL HUGHES, SARAH BELL, NELLIE PITTMAN and SARAH YATES who resides as follows and who are all of age and state the above are all the heirs of decedent who are known to your petitioner except the unknown heirs of Robert Yates deed, the unknown heirs James Yates Deed and the unknown heirs of John Yates and the unknown heirs of John Yates, Jr. and the heirs of Casa Yates and he therefore asks for an order to sell such Real Estate. E. F. Roberson Subscribed and sworn to before me this 24th Day of October, 1865 J. M. Lemonds CK

From this will we know that Benjamin Yates left no children as his heirs, only eight nephews, and five nieces, all of age in 1865. The nephews are named by first names only, so we may assume they were all Yates, John, Tolbert, Silas, Daniel, Eli, Silas, William, George. The nieces are given by their full names, Casa Martin, Rachel Hughes, Sarah Bell, Nellie Pittman, and Sarah Yates; Sarah Bell was Sarah Elizabeth Bell and Ellen Pittman.

After the heirs that were known to the petitioner were listed, he made himself safe, in the legal way, by adding "the unknown heirs of Robert Yates, deceased, the unknown heirs of James Yates, deceased, and the unknown heirs of John Yates and the unknown heirs of John Yates Jr. and the heirs of Casa Yates. So these, with the exception of John Yates, are the brothers and sister of Benjamin Yates, giving us, for the first time, a true Family Group Sheet, with John Yates their father. 
Yates, Benjamin (I2828)
 
160 (On September 7,1837 William Glenn attested that Cassa Yates had the consent of her parents to marry John Martin; Crawford Co., IN. Marriage Consents & Affidavits 1818-1860)

1850 United States Federal Census Name: William Glenn Age: 35 Estimated Birth Year: abt 1815 Birth Place: Tennessee Gender: Male Home in 1850 (City,County,State): Marion, Iowa Family Number: 243 William Glenn 35 Sarah Glenn 14 Mary Ann Glenn 10 Tolbert Glenn 8 
Glenn, William Stone (I3656)
 
161 (Photo Source: bonegap1948added this on 28 May 2009;bonegap1948originally submitted this on 1 May 2009)

Bottom row: Chloe Gill, Thomas Franklin Gill, Mary Allice Gill, and Bradford Oscar Gill. Top row: Daniel Sherman Gill, Lyman Gill, and Edith Gill. 
Gill, Thomas Franklin (I9599)
 
162 (Photo Source: bonegap1948added this on 28 May 2009;bonegap1948originally submitted this on 1 May 2009) Gill, Thomas (I9595)
 
163 (Photo Source: Mary May (1798-1880); bonegap1948added this on 28 May 2009; kllpdmoriginally submitted this to MAY AND GIVANS FAMILY TREE on 7 Apr 2009) May, Mary (I9598)
 
164 (Roberson Family Stories August 2006-Remembered and written by: Jack Roger Roberson, b. 1931)

Ruben followed the tradition of his father, he had 15 children (he had 9...one of which died at birth...so 8 that lived). Besides my grandfather James, I knew Ruben better than any of his siblings. He once went to Montana to farm. I think he worked mostly for his brother Grover. The whole family went and they moved in a model T Ford truck. The engine gave out on the trip. They bought parts and pulled into a vacant field and overhauled it and then continued the trip.

During the World War II people were frozen on their jobs. If you quit they threatened to draft you in the army. Rube was working at the Charlestown, Indiana munitions Plant helping on construction. He wanted out of there very much. Finally they came around and said they would have a layoff the coming payday. Rube said put me in that layoff. When payday came they said they had changed it. It would be next payday. Rube reminded them he wanted to be in it. The next payday, the same thing happened and again and again until one day he told them "This time I am going ". When they came by and told him not that week he threw his hammer into the asbestos siding he was installing and it went all the way thru the wall and thru the building and thru the wall on the other side. They fired him, and he said I told you I was going.

I loved my uncle Rube so much I have nothing but fond memories of him. He ate his breakfast bacon very rare. He had a heart attack in his 50s. He said he threw up whole pieces of bacon that morning with not a tooth mark on them. He dieted and lived several years after that.

From: Lark Reasor; Sent: Friday, September 24, 2010; Ron, Thanks for the attachments and links. I followed a path from your site to the family group of Reuben Russell ROBERSON and Edna Lula SEATON. The list of children has some mistakes you maybe interested in; My husband had gone to one or two when he was a boy. Your cousin in-law Lark

Reuben Russell ROBERSON and Edna Lula SEATON children: Full names, with corrected and missing children in birth order.

1- Amzel Nadine ROBERSON b. 16 Jan 1914 Mt. Carmel, Wabash, Illinois, d.27 May 2003 Louisville, Jefferson, Kentucky.
2- Chester Lloyd ROBERSON b. 13 Sep 1916 Louisville, Jefferson, Kentucky, d. about 2008
3- Janet Marie ROBERSON b. 3 May 1919 , Crawford Co., Indiana, d.31 Dec 1986 Louisville, Jefferson, Kentucky.
4- Wanda Myrl ROBERSON [ living ]
5- Norman Lee ROBERSON b. 30 Sep 1923 , Crawford Co., Indiana, d.7 May 2002 Louisville, Jefferson, Kentucky.
6- Howard Dale ROBERSON b. 28 Dec 1925 , Crawford Co., Indiana, d.30 Oct 2007 South Dakota.
7- (son) ROBERSON b. 26 Dec 1929 Great Falls, Cascade, Montana, d. 1929 Great Falls, Cascade, Montana (infant).
8- Rodger Joseph ROBERSON b.4 Mar 1932 , Crawford Co., Indiana, d.16 Oct 1980 Oklawaha, Florida.
9- Mary Eloise ROBERSON 
Roberson, Reuben Russell (I1826)
 
165 (Source: Ancestry.com; Marriage Information Taken from the Fondren Family Bible by William B. Potter) Fondren, Samuel L. Jr. (I14888)
 
166 (Source: ancestry.com; Telegram sent to Charlotte Maude (Bradbury) Potter in Kansas City informing her of the death of her Mother Susan Elizabeth(Fondren) Bradbury who died of Blood Poisining from a bite by an Ant. This was sent to Kansas City Jackson Missouri where her Son James Fred Brabury also resided as well as her Brother-in-law Howard Bradbury of Kansas City Kansas. Howard was a brother to William Walter Bradbury husband of Susan Elizabeth (Fondren) Bradbury.) Fondren, Susana Elizabeth (I14890)
 
167 (Source: Benham: A Pedigree; Fern Orr Scoudan, John James Bowater; transcribed by Ron Yates, 2012)

Died "from exhaustion after walking two miles to a friend's house with her three month old baby." Described by her son John, "dark complexion, black eyes and hair, high cheek bones, diminutive, considerable beauty." Buried with husband Marcus at Seaton Cemetery, Grantsburg, Crawford Co., IN.; age based on census of 1850 with John Hughes. 
Hughes, Eliza (I3388)
 
168 (Source: Benham: A Pedigree; Fern Orr Scoudan, John James Bowater; transcribed by Ron Yates, 2012) Patrick, Isabelle (I3152)
 
169 (Source: Benham: A Pedigree; Fern Orr Scoudan, John James Bowater; transcribed by Ron Yates, 2012) Benham, Marcus (I3391)
 
170 (Source: Benham: A Pedigree; Fern Orr Scoudan, John James Bowater; transcribed by Ron Yates, 2012) Benham, Mary (I6029)
 
171 (Source: Benham: A Pedigree; Fern Orr Scoudan, John James Bowater; transcribed by Ron Yates, 2012) Benham, Stewart (I6028)
 
172 (Source: Benham: A Pedigree; Fern Orr Scoudan, John James Bowater; transcribed by Ron Yates, 2012) Jenkins, Mary (I5962)
 
173 (Source: Benham: A Pedigree; Fern Orr Scoudan, John James Bowater; transcribed by Ron Yates, 2012) Benham, Jarvis (I5961)
 
174 (Source: Benham: A Pedigree; Fern Orr Scoudan, John James Bowater; transcribed by Ron Yates, 2012) Kincaid, Mary (I5881)
 
175 (Source: Benham: A Pedigree; Fern Orr Scoudan, John James Bowater; transcribed by Ron Yates, 2012) Benham, Hiram (I5880)
 
176 (Source: Benham: A Pedigree; Fern Orr Scoudan, John James Bowater; transcribed by Ron Yates, 2012) Benham, Joseph (I5865)
 
177 (Source: Benham: A Pedigree; Fern Orr Scoudan, John James Bowater; transcribed by Ron Yates, 2012) Wilbur, Henrietta (I5732)
 
178 (Source: Benham: A Pedigree; Fern Orr Scoudan, John James Bowater; transcribed by Ron Yates, 2012) White, Susan (I5097)
 
179 (Source: Benham: A Pedigree; Fern Orr Scoudan, John James Bowater; transcribed by Ron Yates, 2012) Benham, Luther (I5096)
 
180 (SOURCE: BIOGRAPHICAL AND HISTORICAL SOUVENIR FOR THE COUNTIES OF Clark, Crawford, Harrison, Floyd, Jefferson, Jennings, Scott and Washington, INDIANA; John M. Gresham Company, 1889.)

GEORGE W. ROBINSON is a native of Kentucky, and was born Dec. 25, 1830. He is a son of William and Sarah (Lyon) Robinson; the former born in New York in 1774; the latter born in 1764, and died in 1861. The older Robinson came from Ireland in an early day. He served in the Indian wars of the times, and was with Gen. Wayne at the battle of Fallen Timber in 1795, which virtually closed the Revolutionary war, though it had been declared over a decade before. He died in 1853, full of years and full of honors. He had settled in Kentucky, and in 1834 removed to Harrison county, settling in Boone township.

George W., the subject of this sketch, was the youngest of a family of six children. He was brought up on a farm, and received such education as the limited facilities of the county afforded. When the war of the Rebellion commenced he enlisted in Co. K, Fifty-eighth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, Sept. 23, 1864, and was discharged June 30, 1865. He was with Sherman in his "March to the Sea," and participated in all the hardships as well as the fighting of the wonderful campaign. He was at the surrender of Col. Joe Johnston, and participated in the grand review at Washington after the war was over.

He then turned his arms into agricultural implements, and resumed farming. He was married April 17, 1856, to Miss Elizabeth Thompson, of Harrison county, and a daughter of Benjamin and Maria Thompson; the former a native of Harrison County, a farmer and an exemplary member of the Baptist Church; the latter, Maria Brown Thompson, was a daughter of Robert Thompson, who was born on the ocean when his parents were in transit to America. He settled in Kentucky, but later removed to Harrison county, Ind.

Mr. and Mrs. Robinson have had twelve children born to them, viz: Ann M., Lemuel C, Benjamin T., William W., Ulysses G., Henry, Ellondor, Cora S., Mary A., George A., James H. and Edgar R. Ann died Aug. 14, 1858; William W. died Feb. 13, 1864, and Henry died March 28, 1868.

Mr. Robinson has a fruit farm of eighty acres of land, which is in a high state of cultivation, yielding much fine fruit. 
Robinson, Edgar R. (I21375)
 
181 (SOURCE: BIOGRAPHICAL AND HISTORICAL SOUVENIR FOR THE COUNTIES OF Clark, Crawford, Harrison, Floyd, Jefferson, Jennings, Scott and Washington, INDIANA; John M. Gresham Company, 1889.)

GEORGE W. ROBINSON is a native of Kentucky, and was born Dec. 25, 1830. He is a son of William and Sarah (Lyon) Robinson; the former born in New York in 1774; the latter born in 1764, and died in 1861. The older Robinson came from Ireland in an early day. He served in the Indian wars of the times, and was with Gen. Wayne at the battle of Fallen Timber in 1795, which virtually closed the Revolutionary war, though it had been declared over a decade before. He died in 1853, full of years and full of honors. He had settled in Kentucky, and in 1834 removed to Harrison county, settling in Boone township.

George W., the subject of this sketch, was the youngest of a family of six children. He was brought up on a farm, and received such education as the limited facilities of the county afforded. When the war of the Rebellion commenced he enlisted in Co. K, Fifty-eighth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, Sept. 23, 1864, and was discharged June 30, 1865. He was with Sherman in his "March to the Sea," and participated in all the hardships as well as the fighting of the wonderful campaign. He was at the surrender of Col. Joe Johnston, and participated in the grand review at Washington after the war was over.

He then turned his arms into agricultural implements, and resumed farming. He was married April 17, 1856, to Miss Elizabeth Thompson, of Harrison county, and a daughter of Benjamin and Maria Thompson; the former a native of Harrison County, a farmer and an exemplary member of the Baptist Church; the latter, Maria Brown Thompson, was a daughter of Robert Thompson, who was born on the ocean when his parents were in transit to America. He settled in Kentucky, but later removed to Harrison county, Ind.

Mr. and Mrs. Robinson have had twelve children born to them, viz: Ann M., Lemuel C, Benjamin T., William W., Ulysses G., Henry, Ellondor, Cora S., Mary A., George A., James H. and Edgar R. Ann died Aug. 14, 1858; William W. died Feb. 13, 1864, and Henry died March 28, 1868.

Mr. Robinson has a fruit farm of eighty acres of land, which is in a high state of cultivation, yielding much fine fruit. 
Robinson, James H. (I21374)
 
182 (SOURCE: BIOGRAPHICAL AND HISTORICAL SOUVENIR FOR THE COUNTIES OF Clark, Crawford, Harrison, Floyd, Jefferson, Jennings, Scott and Washington, INDIANA; John M. Gresham Company, 1889.)

GEORGE W. ROBINSON is a native of Kentucky, and was born Dec. 25, 1830. He is a son of William and Sarah (Lyon) Robinson; the former born in New York in 1774; the latter born in 1764, and died in 1861. The older Robinson came from Ireland in an early day. He served in the Indian wars of the times, and was with Gen. Wayne at the battle of Fallen Timber in 1795, which virtually closed the Revolutionary war, though it had been declared over a decade before. He died in 1853, full of years and full of honors. He had settled in Kentucky, and in 1834 removed to Harrison county, settling in Boone township.

George W., the subject of this sketch, was the youngest of a family of six children. He was brought up on a farm, and received such education as the limited facilities of the county afforded. When the war of the Rebellion commenced he enlisted in Co. K, Fifty-eighth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, Sept. 23, 1864, and was discharged June 30, 1865. He was with Sherman in his "March to the Sea," and participated in all the hardships as well as the fighting of the wonderful campaign. He was at the surrender of Col. Joe Johnston, and participated in the grand review at Washington after the war was over.

He then turned his arms into agricultural implements, and resumed farming. He was married April 17, 1856, to Miss Elizabeth Thompson, of Harrison county, and a daughter of Benjamin and Maria Thompson; the former a native of Harrison County, a farmer and an exemplary member of the Baptist Church; the latter, Maria Brown Thompson, was a daughter of Robert Thompson, who was born on the ocean when his parents were in transit to America. He settled in Kentucky, but later removed to Harrison county, Ind.

Mr. and Mrs. Robinson have had twelve children born to them, viz: Ann M., Lemuel C, Benjamin T., William W., Ulysses G., Henry, Ellondor, Cora S., Mary A., George A., James H. and Edgar R. Ann died Aug. 14, 1858; William W. died Feb. 13, 1864, and Henry died March 28, 1868.

Mr. Robinson has a fruit farm of eighty acres of land, which is in a high state of cultivation, yielding much fine fruit. 
Robinson, George A. (I21373)
 
183 (SOURCE: BIOGRAPHICAL AND HISTORICAL SOUVENIR FOR THE COUNTIES OF Clark, Crawford, Harrison, Floyd, Jefferson, Jennings, Scott and Washington, INDIANA; John M. Gresham Company, 1889.)

GEORGE W. ROBINSON is a native of Kentucky, and was born Dec. 25, 1830. He is a son of William and Sarah (Lyon) Robinson; the former born in New York in 1774; the latter born in 1764, and died in 1861. The older Robinson came from Ireland in an early day. He served in the Indian wars of the times, and was with Gen. Wayne at the battle of Fallen Timber in 1795, which virtually closed the Revolutionary war, though it had been declared over a decade before. He died in 1853, full of years and full of honors. He had settled in Kentucky, and in 1834 removed to Harrison county, settling in Boone township.

George W., the subject of this sketch, was the youngest of a family of six children. He was brought up on a farm, and received such education as the limited facilities of the county afforded. When the war of the Rebellion commenced he enlisted in Co. K, Fifty-eighth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, Sept. 23, 1864, and was discharged June 30, 1865. He was with Sherman in his "March to the Sea," and participated in all the hardships as well as the fighting of the wonderful campaign. He was at the surrender of Col. Joe Johnston, and participated in the grand review at Washington after the war was over.

He then turned his arms into agricultural implements, and resumed farming. He was married April 17, 1856, to Miss Elizabeth Thompson, of Harrison county, and a daughter of Benjamin and Maria Thompson; the former a native of Harrison County, a farmer and an exemplary member of the Baptist Church; the latter, Maria Brown Thompson, was a daughter of Robert Thompson, who was born on the ocean when his parents were in transit to America. He settled in Kentucky, but later removed to Harrison county, Ind.

Mr. and Mrs. Robinson have had twelve children born to them, viz: Ann M., Lemuel C, Benjamin T., William W., Ulysses G., Henry, Ellondor, Cora S., Mary A., George A., James H. and Edgar R. Ann died Aug. 14, 1858; William W. died Feb. 13, 1864, and Henry died March 28, 1868.

Mr. Robinson has a fruit farm of eighty acres of land, which is in a high state of cultivation, yielding much fine fruit. 
Robinson, Cora S. (I21371)
 
184 (SOURCE: BIOGRAPHICAL AND HISTORICAL SOUVENIR FOR THE COUNTIES OF Clark, Crawford, Harrison, Floyd, Jefferson, Jennings, Scott and Washington, INDIANA; John M. Gresham Company, 1889.)

GEORGE W. ROBINSON is a native of Kentucky, and was born Dec. 25, 1830. He is a son of William and Sarah (Lyon) Robinson; the former born in New York in 1774; the latter born in 1764, and died in 1861. The older Robinson came from Ireland in an early day. He served in the Indian wars of the times, and was with Gen. Wayne at the battle of Fallen Timber in 1795, which virtually closed the Revolutionary war, though it had been declared over a decade before. He died in 1853, full of years and full of honors. He had settled in Kentucky, and in 1834 removed to Harrison county, settling in Boone township.

George W., the subject of this sketch, was the youngest of a family of six children. He was brought up on a farm, and received such education as the limited facilities of the county afforded. When the war of the Rebellion commenced he enlisted in Co. K, Fifty-eighth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, Sept. 23, 1864, and was discharged June 30, 1865. He was with Sherman in his "March to the Sea," and participated in all the hardships as well as the fighting of the wonderful campaign. He was at the surrender of Col. Joe Johnston, and participated in the grand review at Washington after the war was over.

He then turned his arms into agricultural implements, and resumed farming. He was married April 17, 1856, to Miss Elizabeth Thompson, of Harrison county, and a daughter of Benjamin and Maria Thompson; the former a native of Harrison County, a farmer and an exemplary member of the Baptist Church; the latter, Maria Brown Thompson, was a daughter of Robert Thompson, who was born on the ocean when his parents were in transit to America. He settled in Kentucky, but later removed to Harrison county, Ind.

Mr. and Mrs. Robinson have had twelve children born to them, viz: Ann M., Lemuel C, Benjamin T., William W., Ulysses G., Henry, Ellondor, Cora S., Mary A., George A., James H. and Edgar R. Ann died Aug. 14, 1858; William W. died Feb. 13, 1864, and Henry died March 28, 1868.

Mr. Robinson has a fruit farm of eighty acres of land, which is in a high state of cultivation, yielding much fine fruit. 
Robinson, Ellendor Nancy (I21370)
 
185 (SOURCE: BIOGRAPHICAL AND HISTORICAL SOUVENIR FOR THE COUNTIES OF Clark, Crawford, Harrison, Floyd, Jefferson, Jennings, Scott and Washington, INDIANA; John M. Gresham Company, 1889.)

GEORGE W. ROBINSON is a native of Kentucky, and was born Dec. 25, 1830. He is a son of William and Sarah (Lyon) Robinson; the former born in New York in 1774; the latter born in 1764, and died in 1861. The older Robinson came from Ireland in an early day. He served in the Indian wars of the times, and was with Gen. Wayne at the battle of Fallen Timber in 1795, which virtually closed the Revolutionary war, though it had been declared over a decade before. He died in 1853, full of years and full of honors. He had settled in Kentucky, and in 1834 removed to Harrison county, settling in Boone township.

George W., the subject of this sketch, was the youngest of a family of six children. He was brought up on a farm, and received such education as the limited facilities of the county afforded. When the war of the Rebellion commenced he enlisted in Co. K, Fifty-eighth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, Sept. 23, 1864, and was discharged June 30, 1865. He was with Sherman in his "March to the Sea," and participated in all the hardships as well as the fighting of the wonderful campaign. He was at the surrender of Col. Joe Johnston, and participated in the grand review at Washington after the war was over.

He then turned his arms into agricultural implements, and resumed farming. He was married April 17, 1856, to Miss Elizabeth Thompson, of Harrison county, and a daughter of Benjamin and Maria Thompson; the former a native of Harrison County, a farmer and an exemplary member of the Baptist Church; the latter, Maria Brown Thompson, was a daughter of Robert Thompson, who was born on the ocean when his parents were in transit to America. He settled in Kentucky, but later removed to Harrison county, Ind.

Mr. and Mrs. Robinson have had twelve children born to them, viz: Ann M., Lemuel C, Benjamin T., William W., Ulysses G., Henry, Ellondor, Cora S., Mary A., George A., James H. and Edgar R. Ann died Aug. 14, 1858; William W. died Feb. 13, 1864, and Henry died March 28, 1868.

Mr. Robinson has a fruit farm of eighty acres of land, which is in a high state of cultivation, yielding much fine fruit. 
Robinson, Ulysses Grant (I21368)
 
186 (SOURCE: BIOGRAPHICAL AND HISTORICAL SOUVENIR FOR THE COUNTIES OF Clark, Crawford, Harrison, Floyd, Jefferson, Jennings, Scott and Washington, INDIANA; John M. Gresham Company, 1889.)

GEORGE W. ROBINSON is a native of Kentucky, and was born Dec. 25, 1830. He is a son of William and Sarah (Lyon) Robinson; the former born in New York in 1774; the latter born in 1764, and died in 1861. The older Robinson came from Ireland in an early day. He served in the Indian wars of the times, and was with Gen. Wayne at the battle of Fallen Timber in 1795, which virtually closed the Revolutionary war, though it had been declared over a decade before. He died in 1853, full of years and full of honors. He had settled in Kentucky, and in 1834 removed to Harrison county, settling in Boone township.

George W., the subject of this sketch, was the youngest of a family of six children. He was brought up on a farm, and received such education as the limited facilities of the county afforded. When the war of the Rebellion commenced he enlisted in Co. K, Fifty-eighth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, Sept. 23, 1864, and was discharged June 30, 1865. He was with Sherman in his "March to the Sea," and participated in all the hardships as well as the fighting of the wonderful campaign. He was at the surrender of Col. Joe Johnston, and participated in the grand review at Washington after the war was over.

He then turned his arms into agricultural implements, and resumed farming. He was married April 17, 1856, to Miss Elizabeth Thompson, of Harrison county, and a daughter of Benjamin and Maria Thompson; the former a native of Harrison County, a farmer and an exemplary member of the Baptist Church; the latter, Maria Brown Thompson, was a daughter of Robert Thompson, who was born on the ocean when his parents were in transit to America. He settled in Kentucky, but later removed to Harrison county, Ind.

Mr. and Mrs. Robinson have had twelve children born to them, viz: Ann M., Lemuel C, Benjamin T., William W., Ulysses G., Henry, Ellondor, Cora S., Mary A., George A., James H. and Edgar R. Ann died Aug. 14, 1858; William W. died Feb. 13, 1864, and Henry died March 28, 1868.

Mr. Robinson has a fruit farm of eighty acres of land, which is in a high state of cultivation, yielding much fine fruit. 
Robinson, Benjamin T. (I21366)
 
187 (SOURCE: BIOGRAPHICAL AND HISTORICAL SOUVENIR FOR THE COUNTIES OF Clark, Crawford, Harrison, Floyd, Jefferson, Jennings, Scott and Washington, INDIANA; John M. Gresham Company, 1889.)

GEORGE W. ROBINSON is a native of Kentucky, and was born Dec. 25, 1830. He is a son of William and Sarah (Lyon) Robinson; the former born in New York in 1774; the latter born in 1764, and died in 1861. The older Robinson came from Ireland in an early day. He served in the Indian wars of the times, and was with Gen. Wayne at the battle of Fallen Timber in 1795, which virtually closed the Revolutionary war, though it had been declared over a decade before. He died in 1853, full of years and full of honors. He had settled in Kentucky, and in 1834 removed to Harrison county, settling in Boone township.

George W., the subject of this sketch, was the youngest of a family of six children. He was brought up on a farm, and received such education as the limited facilities of the county afforded. When the war of the Rebellion commenced he enlisted in Co. K, Fifty-eighth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, Sept. 23, 1864, and was discharged June 30, 1865. He was with Sherman in his "March to the Sea," and participated in all the hardships as well as the fighting of the wonderful campaign. He was at the surrender of Col. Joe Johnston, and participated in the grand review at Washington after the war was over.

He then turned his arms into agricultural implements, and resumed farming. He was married April 17, 1856, to Miss Elizabeth Thompson, of Harrison county, and a daughter of Benjamin and Maria Thompson; the former a native of Harrison County, a farmer and an exemplary member of the Baptist Church; the latter, Maria Brown Thompson, was a daughter of Robert Thompson, who was born on the ocean when his parents were in transit to America. He settled in Kentucky, but later removed to Harrison county, Ind.

Mr. and Mrs. Robinson have had twelve children born to them, viz: Ann M., Lemuel C, Benjamin T., William W., Ulysses G., Henry, Ellondor, Cora S., Mary A., George A., James H. and Edgar R. Ann died Aug. 14, 1858; William W. died Feb. 13, 1864, and Henry died March 28, 1868.

Mr. Robinson has a fruit farm of eighty acres of land, which is in a high state of cultivation, yielding much fine fruit. 
Robinson, Lemuel C. (I21365)
 
188 (SOURCE: BIOGRAPHICAL AND HISTORICAL SOUVENIR FOR THE COUNTIES OF Clark, Crawford, Harrison, Floyd, Jefferson, Jennings, Scott and Washington, INDIANA; John M. Gresham Company, 1889.)

GEORGE W. ROBINSON is a native of Kentucky, and was born Dec. 25, 1830. He is a son of William and Sarah (Lyon) Robinson; the former born in New York in 1774; the latter born in 1764, and died in 1861. The older Robinson came from Ireland in an early day. He served in the Indian wars of the times, and was with Gen. Wayne at the battle of Fallen Timber in 1795, which virtually closed the Revolutionary war, though it had been declared over a decade before. He died in 1853, full of years and full of honors. He had settled in Kentucky, and in 1834 removed to Harrison county, settling in Boone township.

George W., the subject of this sketch, was the youngest of a family of six children. He was brought up on a farm, and received such education as the limited facilities of the county afforded. When the war of the Rebellion commenced he enlisted in Co. K, Fifty-eighth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, Sept. 23, 1864, and was discharged June 30, 1865. He was with Sherman in his "March to the Sea," and participated in all the hardships as well as the fighting of the wonderful campaign. He was at the surrender of Col. Joe Johnston, and participated in the grand review at Washington after the war was over.

He then turned his arms into agricultural implements, and resumed farming. He was married April 17, 1856, to Miss Elizabeth Thompson, of Harrison county, and a daughter of Benjamin and Maria Thompson; the former a native of Harrison County, a farmer and an exemplary member of the Baptist Church; the latter, Maria Brown Thompson, was a daughter of Robert Thompson, who was born on the ocean when his parents were in transit to America. He settled in Kentucky, but later removed to Harrison county, Ind.

Mr. and Mrs. Robinson have had twelve children born to them, viz: Ann M., Lemuel C, Benjamin T., William W., Ulysses G., Henry, Ellondor, Cora S., Mary A., George A., James H. and Edgar R. Ann died Aug. 14, 1858; William W. died Feb. 13, 1864, and Henry died March 28, 1868.

Mr. Robinson has a fruit farm of eighty acres of land, which is in a high state of cultivation, yielding much fine fruit. 
Thompson, Elizabeth (I21362)
 
189 (SOURCE: BIOGRAPHICAL AND HISTORICAL SOUVENIR FOR THE COUNTIES OF Clark, Crawford, Harrison, Floyd, Jefferson, Jennings, Scott and Washington, INDIANA; John M. Gresham Company, 1889.)

GEORGE W. ROBINSON is a native of Kentucky, and was born Dec. 25, 1830. He is a son of William and Sarah (Lyon) Robinson; the former born in New York in 1774; the latter born in 1764, and died in 1861. The older Robinson came from Ireland in an early day. He served in the Indian wars of the times, and was with Gen. Wayne at the battle of Fallen Timber in 1795, which virtually closed the Revolutionary war, though it had been declared over a decade before. He died in 1853, full of years and full of honors. He had settled in Kentucky, and in 1834 removed to Harrison county, settling in Boone township.

George W., the subject of this sketch, was the youngest of a family of six children. He was brought up on a farm, and received such education as the limited facilities of the county afforded. When the war of the Rebellion commenced he enlisted in Co. K, Fifty-eighth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, Sept. 23, 1864, and was discharged June 30, 1865. He was with Sherman in his "March to the Sea," and participated in all the hardships as well as the fighting of the wonderful campaign. He was at the surrender of Col. Joe Johnston, and participated in the grand review at Washington after the war was over.

He then turned his arms into agricultural implements, and resumed farming. He was married April 17, 1856, to Miss Elizabeth Thompson, of Harrison county, and a daughter of Benjamin and Maria Thompson; the former a native of Harrison County, a farmer and an exemplary member of the Baptist Church; the latter, Maria Brown Thompson, was a daughter of Robert Thompson, who was born on the ocean when his parents were in transit to America. He settled in Kentucky, but later removed to Harrison county, Ind.

Mr. and Mrs. Robinson have had twelve children born to them, viz: Ann M., Lemuel C, Benjamin T., William W., Ulysses G., Henry, Ellondor, Cora S., Mary A., George A., James H. and Edgar R. Ann died Aug. 14, 1858; William W. died Feb. 13, 1864, and Henry died March 28, 1868.

Mr. Robinson has a fruit farm of eighty acres of land, which is in a high state of cultivation, yielding much fine fruit. 
Robinson, George W. (I21361)
 
190 (Source: bonnebluadded this on 30 Jun 2008) "Evidently, Thomas Bauman, was a rebel of sorts. He left his family in Oklahoma, leaving them to fend for themselves, moved to English, Indiana, and married another woman. I have been unable to find this 2nd "wife." On September 24, 1898, Thomas was arrested for bigamy, went to court, and served about 1 year in jail for the offense. While I have not found any records to indicate the location, I suspect Corydon, Indiana, is where any records of this arrest would be found." Baumann, Thomas R. (I2574)
 
191 (Source: Carlene Warner via misc e-mail communication with Ron Yates)The Indiana State Board of Health Certificate of Death, Record Number 397, lists name as Catherine Laswell, so one must assume she was known by her middle name. Her occupation is listed as Domestic, which could signify "housewife." Although her husband, David Laswell, was still alive at the time of her death, her son, Edward Laswell, of Cape Sandy, Indiana, was the informant. According to the Certificate, she had tuberculosis for five years or more.

February 29, 1912; Death of Mrs. David Laswell; The death of Mrs. Catherine Laswell wife of David Laswell, of Cape Sandy, formally of Union Township, occurred February 29th at place of residence. Her remains were brought to Pleasant Ridge Cemetery for internment.

She was a life long christian having united with the United Brethren Church at the age of eighteen years. She leaves a husband who is blind, three sons and one daughter living, four children having preceded her in death. Funeral was preached by the writer Rev. J.E. Rowe.

1850 United States Federal Census about Catharine Curl Name: Catharine Curl Age: 14 Birth Year: abt 1836 Birthplace: Indiana Home in 1850: District 45, Harrison, Indiana Race: White Gender: Female Family Number: 859 Household Members: Name Age Richard Curl 42 Mariah Curl 34 Frances Curl 15 Catharine Curl 14 Elisabeth Curl 11 John Curl 9 Dennis Curl 7 Harriet Curl 6 Peter Curl 4 Henry Curl 2 Martin Curl 0 Henry Steepro 23

1860 United States Federal Census about Catharine Currel Name: Catharine Currel [Catharine Curl] Age in 1860: 22 Birth Year: abt 1838 Birthplace: Indiana Home in 1860: Union, Crawford, Indiana Gender: Female Post Office: Grantsburg Value of real estate: View image Household Members: Name Age Richd Currel 54 Maria Currel 44 Catharine Currel 22 John Currel 17 Richd Currel 14 Harriet Currel 13 Peter Currel 12 Henry Currel 10 Martin Currel 9 Clark Currel 7 Palmzra Currel 2 View Original Record View original image

Indiana, Marriage Collection, 1800-1941 about Catharine Curl Name: Catharine Curl Spouse Name: David M. Laswell Marriage Date: 7 Apr 1864 Marriage County: Crawford

U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900 about Mariah Catherine Curl Name: Mariah Catherine Curl Gender: Female Birth Year: 1837 Spouse Name: David Morton Laswell Spouse Birth Place: KY Spouse Birth Year: 1837 Number Pages: 1

1880 United States Federal Census about Kate Laswell Name: Kate Laswell Age: 43 Birth Year: abt 1837 Birthplace: Indiana Home in 1880: Union, Crawford, Indiana Race: White Gender: Female Relation to Head of House: Wife Marital Status: Married Spouse's Name: David Laswell Father's Birthplace: Virginia Mother's Birthplace: Kentucky Neighbors: View others on page Occupation: Keeping House Cannot read/write: Blind: Deaf and Dumb: Otherwise disabled: Idiotic or insane: View image Household Members: Name Age David Laswell 44 Kate Laswell 43 Sherman Laswell 10 Edward Laswell 6 Martin Laswell 3 Elzada Laswell 1

1900 United States Federal Census about Catherine Laswell Name: Catherine Laswell Age: 62 Birth Date: Jun 1837 Birthplace: Indiana Home in 1900: Union, Crawford, Indiana Race: White Gender: Female Relation to Head of House: Wife Marital Status: Married Spouse's Name: D M Laswell Marriage Year: 1864 Years Married: 36 Father's Birthplace: Virginia Mother's Birthplace: Indiana Occupation: View on Image Neighbors: View others on page Household Members: Name Age D M Laswell 63 Catherine Laswell 62 Edward P Laswell 25 Elsie Laswell 6 Delbert Laswell 4

1910 United States Federal Census about Catherine Laswell Name: Catherine Laswell Age in 1910: 72 Birth Year: abt 1838 Birthplace: Indiana Home in 1910: Ohio, Crawford, Indiana Race: White Gender: Female Relation to Head of House: Wife Marital Status: Married Spouse's Name: D M Laswell Father's Birthplace: Indiana Mother's Birthplace: Indiana Neighbors: View others on page Household Members: Name Age D M Laswell 73 Catherine Laswell 72 Sherman Laswell 40 Jessie L Laswell 20 Catherine Laswell 18 Wayne Laswell 16 Ruth Laswell 9 Edna O Laswell 7 
Curl, Mariah Catherine (I370)
 
192 (Source: Carter County History By Tonia Rose, staff writer Jan. 13, 2010 January 14, 2010 09:43 am) The story of murder and lynching began when Austin Porter, 21, (recorded often incorrectly as Oscar or Ostin) of Elliott County stabbed and killed his wife Charlotte “Lottie” Yates Porter. The two were married in Carter County Jan. 11, 1889. Porter was a teacher and admired by one of his female students. Realizing she was not going to gain his undivided attention, the student went to Lottie and told that Porter had a girlfriend. A Journal-Times reporter recently contacted Lottie's niece, Francis Adams Perry, of Alaska and native of Willard, and asked about Lottie and Porter's relationship. Perry said after the student spread the rumor, Lottie left Porter and moved in with her parents George W. and Perlina McDavid Yates.

“She (student) had lied to Lottie in hopes she would get Austin,” Perry recalled what her friend Eleanor McDavid Brewster of Little Fork told her. “She caused a separation and a man to kill his wife in a passion of love and anxiety, after she refused to come back to him." About 3 a.m. May 26, 1892, Austin went to the home in hopes that Lottie would talk with him through the window. After she refused, he crawled through the window, and in a moment of heated anger, he stabbed Lottie to death as she slept beside their 1-year-old son Albert Sydney. Albert was raised by Lottie's parents and went on to become a physician in West Virginia. He died May 18, 1976, at the age of 85, in Athens Ohio.

According to a ballad written about her death, Lottie's father entered the bedroom as she faintly spoke her last words, “Daddy he killed me.” According to history, Porter watched his wife's funeral from a nearby hillside. With little resistance he soon surrendered to authorities and admitted his guilt. Three weeks later, June 19, an angry mob of more than 100 people marched to Willard, where at midnight, they forced E.K. Railroad engineer Bill Duke to fire up his locomotive and head toward Grayson to the Carter County Jail. Lottie would have turned 19 on that day.

Throughout the trip to Grayson, Duke was ordered not to blow the whistle or ring the bell under the penalty of instant death. While armed with guns, the mob quietly arrived in town and began the one-half mile walk to the jail. The time was about 2 a.m. “I'm gone,” Porter told the jailer as the mob entered the cell. He then begged that the jailer would see to it that his body would be buried next to his wife or beside his sister.

The train arrived at a bridge over Dry Fork in Willard, known as Porter Bridge due to the hanging. Once there, the mob put a clothesline size rope around Porter's neck and tied the other end to the bridge. He moaned and cried aloud, but the only distinctive words were, “O' Lord, have mercy.”

When they pushed him off the bridge the rope suddenly snapped. But that didn't stop the angry mob as they fished Porter from the water and made a new knot. He was left hanging between the bridge timbers and the creek below. At 10 a.m. the body was surrounded by hundreds of men, women and children. According to history, it was a horrible spectacle. Porter was an attractive man, but his death by hanging, showed a man with a distorted face, bulging eyes, protruding tongue and a lacerated neck. Upon arrival of the coroner, the body was cut down and taken to the Willard Depot where an investigation was held and the body was then turned over to his friends for burial.

“The verdict of the jury…”We the jury find…he came to his death by strangulation of a rope thereupon by whom we don't know.” The undisputed feelings of the people were that Porter deserved his fate. (Source: Carter County History By Tonia Rose, staff writer Jan. 13, 2010 January 14, 2010 09:43 am) 
Porter, Austin (I12602)
 
193 (SOURCE: Chrisman Courier November 8, 1945 page 8) Rites here for Mrs. Jane Gunn here last Monday; Mrs. Jane Gunn, resident of Chrisman some 40 years ago, died Saturday, Nov. 3, at Normal. Funeral services were conducted by her pastor, Rev. I.S. Corn, at the Normal Methodist Church Monday morning. The body was interred in Chrisman Woodland Cemetery Monday afternoon, Dr. Carlos Dunagan officiating. Mrs. Gun had lived well into her 93rd year.

Illinois, Deaths and Stillbirths Index, 1916-1947 Name: Jane Gunn Birth Date: 27 May 1853 Birth Place: Washington Co , Illinois Death Date: 3 Nov 1945 Death Place: Limestone, Peoria, Illinois Burial Date: 5 Nov 1945 Burial Place: Chrisman, Edgar, Illinois Cemetery Name: Chrisman Death Age: 92 Race: White Marital Status: S Gender: Female Street Address: 801 S. Morris Street Residence: Bloomington, McClean, Illinois Father Name: Joseph Gunn Father Birth Place: Tennessse Mother Name: Anna Tobman Mother Birth Place: Illinois FHL Film Number: 1984362 
Gunn, Jane (I5714)
 
194 (Source: Clement F. Heverly, Pioneer and Patriot Families of Bradford County, 1770-1800, Vol. 1, Bradford Star Print, 1913 EARLY MARRIAGES, JUSTICES AND MINISTERS IN BRADFORD COUNTY Records From 1820 to 1830

1829 Smithfield's First Public Wedding; The day set apart for the noteworthy occasion had at last arrived, and there was gladness in the log cabin of Elias Needham. The day was to witness the marriage of Constant Williams and Miss Lucy Needham. Accordingly, the house was put in the very best order, and arrangements made for the wedding supper. The affair was to be "secret," and only a few of the neighbors were invited, among whom was Squire Pierce, who was to perform the ceremony. When the company arrived they found the young couple, happy and blushing, in their homespun garbs. After the ceremony had been completed, the festive board was prepared to receive the wedding knickknacks, which were baking in the stone-oven without. These were corn-cakes and baked beans. When all were ready to partake of the extraordinary feast, it was found that the oven had been looted and the company must retire supperless. "Who had done the mischief?" We will explain.

"The secret was not kept, and nearly the whole neighborhood had been posted of the forthcoming wedding. Accordingly, the ox-teams were hitched to sleighs and the people, old and young, brought out and assembled in a neighbor's house nearby. Needham's oven was watched, and when an opportunity offered, the corn-cakes and beans were slipped out and eaten by the merry spirits. In the evening the young people participated in a good, old-fashioned 'shin-dig' to make more complete the memory of the first public wedding in Smithfield. 
Needham, Lucy (I5098)
 
195 (SOURCE: Comments: My great-grandmother was Harriet M. Yates (1831 - 1890). K. Clark has listed her on Wikitree. Just getting started in genealogy, I've spent the most time trying to find Harriet's parents. I notice that most of the Yates that are noted on Wikitree are from states South of New York. Since Harriet's husband, Alonzo was from Mayfield, New York I found there were many Yates living nearby in Montgomery County. I traced their families from Joseph (1645, Leeds, Eng - 1730) Albany,New York. Although, most of Joseph's ancestors soon settled in the Albany / Schenectaty area, many moved on to Montgomery County. So far that has been a dead end so, I have been searching census records to see what Yates could be possible parents. Most of those that left New York ended up in Michigan, but perhaps some settled farther South. Harriet was 1st enumerated in Town of Yates in 1855. Harriet's burial records show her born in Broome County, although census records show her born in Cortland County. I've checked both - possible parents, but no Harriet listed. [I am waiting for records from the Town of Yates (NY), hoping to discover some clues. I grew up there, but spent my adult life in the Chicago area and now am retired in Macon, GA.] It would be good to learn that Harriet's parents continued to Indiana and we were related. I'm sure you have seen this on Benjamin (buried in Dryden, Tompkins, NY), son of Lemuel: http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=connectville&id=I14350&printer_friendly Also a Benjamin (abt 1805) is enumerated in Harford, Cortland, NY in the 1855 census, with wife Henrietta and children: Marvia A (about 1832), Adalade D (abt 1838) and Martin H (abt 1842). I have created 2 trees (Wayne Woodworth Tree & Harriet Yates Tree) on Ancestry.com, but have not uploaded to GEDCOM, so don't know if you can find them. I have 4 pictures of Harriet. Let me know if you would like me to pass them along. Best regards, Wayne Wayne Woodworth www@3iResearch.com

I appreciate your quick response Ron. I am enclosing 5 pix: 1 of Harriet Yates Woodworth, (2) of Harriet with husband, Alonzo, and 1 with Alonzo and Harriet (on the right) with their daughter, Ella, and son-in-law, Theo. The last one is Willett with Cousin. Willett (my grandfather) was Harriet's son. The pic sez that the cousin is from Michigan. I have not yet identified her, but most likely (at this point) she was a Yates cousin. The picture was taken in Hudson (Lenawee) Michigan. Census records aren't favorable to many Yates in Lenawee at that time. Willett was born 1835 and they look about the same age. I don't see many Yates listed in Wikitree, but perhaps you have an associate specializing in the Michigan lineage you could pass this one on to. I'm also attaching the work-in-progress spreadsheet I have put together. 'Don't know if it's any use to you or not. I have not included the Montgomery County Yates(most of them are on my Yates Ancestry.com tree). Also, did not include Southeast NY or the Albany area. My compliments on all of your efforts. 'Will keep you informed. Wayne ----- Original Message ----- From: Ron Yates To: www@3iResearch.com Sent: Tuesday, September 24, 2013) 
Woodworth, Willett G. (I23866)
 
196 (SOURCE: Crawford Co. Death Records Index, Crawford County Health Department 1899-2002) Burch, Florence C. (I26408)
 
197 (Source: Daily Ardmoreite) HEALDTON -- Graveside rites for Fred L. Roberson, 70, will be at 3 p.m. today at Mount Olive Cemetery with Alan Eck officiating. Roberson died Sept. 7, 1998 in the Oklahoma Veterans Center in Ardmore. He was born Nov. 8, 1927, at Wirt, to Mann and Myrtle Davis Roberson. A lifetime resident of this area, he served in the Army and was a retired bus driver and barber. He was a member of Ardmore DAV. He is survived by a brother, Bill, DeLeon, Texas. Reser Funeral Home will direct services. Roberson, Fred Loren (I17479)
 
198 (SOURCE: David Owen's Revolutionary War Service Record; Added by Ronald Yates on 8 September 2009; Added by RogerSowder on 15 May 2009; Originally submitted by cowens4728 to Owens and Mullins Families on 7 Jul 2007)

David Owen was born on 21 September 1759, probably in that portion of Halifax County, Virginia that became Pittsylvania County in 1767. David's father was William Owen II, born ca. 1725 in Virginia, died in Wilkes County, North Carolina, ca. 1787, his mother is not known at this time. In 1772, William moved his family from Pittsylvania County, Virginia to the Reddies River section of Surrey County, North Carolina. In 1777, this area was included in the creation of Wilkes County, North Carolina. William Owen II owned and operated a gristmill on the North Fork of the Reddies River as well as running a plantation consisting of several hundred acres.

William Owen II's, will, dated 28 September 1785, was probated in Wilkes County on 28 January 1788. He left the balance of his estate to his son David, after first bequeathing, to quote his will, "one shillion starling in gold or silver" to his other children - John, William, Thomas, Barnet, Mary Denny (she is the presumed wife of Elijah Denny, although no documentation has thus far been found), Anne Dudley (wife of William Dudley) and Elizabeth Judd (wife of Nathaniel Judd). William also made provision for his grandson, Elisha, first born child of David, to receive fifty pounds upon his coming of age. One of the witnesses to William's will was his nephew, Francis Kearby, son of William's sister, Joanah Owen and her husband, John Kearby. Other than David, his sisters Mary Denny and Elizabeth Judd, little is known of William II's other children.

In the spring of 1779, during the Revolutionary War, David Owen, described as a "true Whig," enlisted in the North Carolina Militia. He, along with three hundred North Carolina militiamen, served under Colonel Benjamin Cleveland at the "Battle of King's Mountain" on 7 October 1780. In this battle, the British and Tories, under the command of Colonel Patrick Ferguson, were soundly defeated. He was also one of the three hundred fifty North Carolinians at the "Battle of the Cowpens" on 17 January 1781, under Colonel Daniel Morgan. In this fight, the British troops under Colonel Banastre "Bloody" Tarleton were forced into a full rout. Most of the British troops were either killed or captured in this engagement, however their commander, Tarlton, escaped. David, along with his brother, Barnet, also served in Captain William Lenoir's company in several engagements in and around Wilkes County. David served in the militia off and on until spring of 1782.

The only physical description known of David Owen is in his Revolutionary War pension records and came from Revolutionary War veteran, Jacob Gabbert of Laurel County, Kentucky. Jacob, in an affidavit, attested to David's service in the Revolution, saying that, although they didn't serve in the same company, he saw David often between 1780 and sometime in the spring of 1782. Jacob said "they had formed an acquaintance over the years" and described David as "an uncommon large man with a tremendous voice."

David's presumed brother-in-law, Elijah Denny, a Revolutionary War veteran, also gave an affidavit. He said that he was "raised" with David in Wilkes County, North Carolina and knew that David served in the army for three years. Elijah also said that he was present at the marriage of David and Winefred Mullins, but could not recollect the exact date other than it was during the war. Elijah was over ninety years old at the time he gave his statement in 1850 and was described by Dr. Adams Crawford, Justice of the Peace and Elijah's son-in-law, as "a man of advanced years, but with a good memory." Elijah died on 26 April 1868, at the reported age of 110. Although some researchers disagree with this age, all agree that he was well over 100 years old when he died.

A marriage bond was issued in Wilkes County, North Carolina, on 16 December 1780, to insure the marriage of David Owen and Winefred Mullins. The pension records suggest they were married on 20 December 1781, however, since the bond was dated a year earlier, the actual date may well have been 20 December 1780. Winefred Mullins was born, probably in Halifax County, Virginia, on 30 March 1766. Although no documentation has been found, all evidence indicates that Winefred was the daughter of Henry Mullins and his wife, who is believed to have been Mary "Polly" Terry. Mary's parents are unknown at this time. Henry Mullins and his family were close neighbors of William Owen II., and his sons, in Wilkes County, North Carolina. According to the 1782 Wilkes County Tax records both families owned acreage along the Reddies River. The 1795-97 Wilkes County Taxables in District No. 10 lists David Owen and his brothers, along with Henry Mullins and his sons, Terry, Spencer and Champness, as having farms close to each other. These Owen and Mullins families are also shown on the 1800 Wilkes County census.

Like many pioneer families, David and Winefred had a large family - twelve boys and one girl. The children were - Elisha, born 9 January 1782, died before 1860, married (1) Lucy Lasswell and (2) Barbara Summers. Wilmouth, born 8 December 1784, died ca. 1870, married John Lasswell on 14 January 1804. Morton, born 19 February 1787, died before 1840, married Elizabeth Farris on 16 January 1806. Martin, born 19 January 1789, died before 1850, married Phoebe Knight on 31 March 1806. Isham, born 12 October 1790, died very young. Samuel, born 29 January 1792, died 1813, never married. Allen, born 24 December 1793, died 28 September 1847, married Mary Kilbourn on 9 November 1815. Webster, born 30 July 1795, died 2 June 1852, married Isabel Cummins. Burton, born 1 December 1798, died 3 April 1840, married Lavincy Riggs. Wesley, born 20 May 1801, died April 1876, married his cousin, Louisa Ann Mullins, daughter of Spencer Mullins. Alfred, born 20 September 1803, died after 1880, married his cousin, Rebecca Mullins, daughter of Champion Mullins. Logan, born 13 April 1805, died 1825, never married. John, born December 1809, died before October 1853.

In the early 1800's, a move of any distance would have been a trying experience, but David and Winefred Mullins Owen undertook a major move, taking their family and belongings from Wilkes County to Kentucky through some of the most rugged and hazardous territory in North Carolina, Virginia, Tennessee, and Kentucky. They left Wilkes County sometime in 1803 or 1804, probably following the trail into Virginia, to the Powell Valley in Tennessee, and then up through Cumberland Gap into Kentucky along the "Wilderness Road." They settled in what is now Rockcastle County. Over the years, David acquired much acreage on the Dix River, Skegg Creek and the Rockcastle River.

It appears that Elijah Denny and his family along with the Mullins families came to Kentucky along with David and his group. The Owens and Mullins families all settled in the same area of Rockcastle County and continued their close association in Kentucky, with both playing an important part in the early development of Rockcastle County. There were several Owens-Mullins marriages in the early years and later intermarriages between cousins. The new families continued using the same names for their many children, thus creating a genealogical nightmare for those of us trying to sort out the Owens-Mullins families in Rockcastle County. David Owens (an "s" was added to the name sometime after 1810) died in 1822 and Winefred died on 26 February 1842. Both David and Winefred are buried in Rockcastle County, but their exact burial sites remain unknown. A marker was placed on Winefred's grave by her son-in-law, John Laswell, who stated in an affidavit that he "carved her name and deth date on her toom stone soon after her deth." The marker has not been found.

In April 1850, according to David Owen's Revolutionary War pension records, the six surviving heirs of David and Winefred filed a pension application. The six were Elisha Owen, Webster Owen, Wesley Owen, Alfred Owen, John Owen, and their sister Wilmouth Owen Laswell. They applied to the United States Pension Office for a pension in accordance with the provisions of an Act of Congress, enacted on 21 July 1836, to benefit Revolutionary War veterans and their widows. To support their claim, the heirs filed various family records, payroll statements from the Comptroller of the State of North Carolina, as well as several affidavits from other Revolutionary War veterans who attested they knew David Owens served in the army during the Revolution. Subsequently, a pension certificate was issued in the names of the heirs in the amount of $80 per annum, retroactive from 21 July 1836, to Winefred's death in 1842, with a lump sum being paid to the heirs. A new certificate was also issued effective from 1842 until sometime in 1853, at which time the certificate was suspended due to the deaths of Webster Owens in June 1852, and John Owens, prior to October 1853. On 22 September 1853, James M. Smith, a lawyer of Mt. Vernon, KY wrote to the executor of Webster Owens' estate in Platte County, MO indicating that he had obtained a pension of $876 for the heirs of Winefred Owens, wife of David Owens. There is no information showing if these funds were ever distributed to the heirs in Platte County. The four remaining heirs in Rockcastle County, Elisha Owens, Wesley Owens, Alfred Owens and Wilmouth Owens Laswell made application in October 1853, requesting that the pension certificate be reinstated. Apparently their request was denied.

One of the interesting documents found in David's pension file has created a puzzling situation. On 4 February 1820, the General Assembly of the Commonwealth of Kentucky approved "an act totally dissolving the marriage of David and Winney Owens." Although this information is in the records, the pension application and other supporting affidavits say that David Owens and Winefred Owens lived together as man and wife until David'd death in 1822.

Another interesting item in the pension file denotes a controversy created when the heirs gave their powers of attorney, at separate times, to two unrelated individuals, Lawyers, James S. Fish and James M. Smith. The two men were to serve as agents to help the heirs secure a new certificate of pension. Evidence shows the controversy arose when Mr. Fish accused Mr. Smith of "fraud and duress" in the names of the four heirs - Wilmouth Laswell, Elisha, Wesley, and Alfred Owens. On 11 October 1853, all four heirs presented an affidavit praising Mr. Smith and stating that he had done no wrong. On the other hand, Mr. Smith made the same accusation against Mr. Fish. In a letter to the Commissioner of Pensions, which was sent along with the affidavit, Mr. Smith said that Mr. Fish had drawn "fraudulent papers" in the names of the four heirs and described Fish as "a violent enemy of mine." Unfortunately, there is no indication in the file as to how this dispute was resolved. David Owen's Revolutionary War Pension Records, over 79 entries, can be found in the National Archives microfilm series, M-804, Roll 1855. (SOURCE: David and Winefred Mullins Owen were the author's G-G-G Grandparents; Charles Sterling Owens - cowens01@charter.net)

(SOURCE: http://www.nose4bs.com/Ky_David_Owen.htm) David Owen served for three years in the North Carolina Militia during the Revolutionary War. He was in Col. Benjamin Cleveland's Company at the Battle of King's Mountain on October 7, 1780. He served under Col. Daniel Morgan at the Battle of Cowpens on January 17, 1781. He also served with Captain William Lenoir in and around Wilkes County, NC.

On December 20, 1780 in Wilkes Co., North Carolina, David married Winefred Mullins, born March 30, 1766 in Halifax Co., Virginia, the daughter of Henry Mullins and Mary Terry. David and Winefred moved their family from Wilkes County to Rockcastle County, KY in 1803.

David Owen and Winefred Mullins had thirteen children, including: Elisha Owen, born January 9, 1782 in Wilkes Co., North Carolina who married Lucy Laswell, born about 1785 in Wilkes Co., North Carolina; Allen Owen, born December 24, 1793 in Wilkes Co., North Carolina, who married Mary Kilbourn, born about 1798 in Pulaski Co., Kentucky; Burton Owen, born December 1, 1798 in Wilkes Co., North Carolina who married Lavincy Riggs, born about 1800 in North Carolina; Wesley Owen, born May 20, 1801 in Wilkes Co., North Carolina who married Louisa Ann Mullins, born about 1802 in Wilkes Co., North Carolina. 
Owen, David (I9476)
 
199 (Source: david Roberson; robey76@msn.com) Ron: don't know if you remember...but you sent me some info on our past years ago....thank you...checking in to see if anything new has popped up?; Also, a few corrections...under Reuben Russell Roberson; Howard Dale ...did not die as a child...that is my dad....they had a baby die at birth..after him; he was born Dec.25,1925....married to Maxine Purington born April 7,1927; sons...Daniel Lynn Roberson b.July3,1948 Louisville,Ky; David Howard R....b.Jan.5,1953 Louisville,Ky; Gary Russell R..b.Feb.1,1958 Rapid City,So.Dakota; David's sons.........married to Susan Mae Garding Aug.5,1972; John David Roberson b.May 9,1973; Joseph Thomas R....b. Sept.14,1977; Jesse Mi R....b. Aug. 14,1986.....Pusan,Korea

Your Name: John Roberson; Email Address: Robey1knobe@yhaoo.com; Wow! This is incredible information. I just wanted to say hello.I am Howard's grandson and as you may already know he passed on Tuesday. Anyhow,I am enthralled reading these accounts of my anscestors. Thank you for all of this! Sincerely, John Roberson

(11/20/2011; Proposed Change: Reuben Russell Roberson (I1826); Description: Reuben R. Roberson DID NOT have 15 children....he had 9...one of which died at birth...so 8 that lived....please change....Amzel,Chester,Marie,Norman,Mary,Howard,Joe,Wanda; david Howard; Description: Howard Dale Roberson died in Rapid City,South Dakota; roberson; robey76@msn.com)

U.S., Department of Veterans Affairs BIRLS Death File, 1850-2010 Name: Howard Roberson Gender: Male Birth Date: 28 Dec 1925 Death Date: 30 Oct 2007 Branch 1: ARMY Enlistment Date 1: 24 Jan 1944 Release Date 1: 24 Oct 1945 
Roberson, Howard Dale (I3899)
 
200 (Source: finadagrave.com; George Sigler was the son of Isaac W. Sigler and Martha Jane Davis. He was born in Perry County and married Nancy M. Keysacker on October 18, 1866. The couple purchased a farm outside of Eckerty in Crawford County and raised their family there. Father of Sonora Ellen "Dall" (married George Newton), Willard (married Lillie Nulton), Martha (married William St. Clair), Mary E. (died in infancy), and Annie (married Gilbert St. Clair).) Sigler, George Washington (I14412)
 

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